show all

Our company created its Supplier Diversity Program more than 30 years ago to establish successful business relationships with qualified suppliers who can provide products and services that we use.

Supplier registration does not guarantee a request for bid, it will offer our procurement personnel the ability to further identify your business capabilities when an opportunity arises.

We look forward to the opportunity to partner with all types of businesses including small, women-, minority-, HUBZone-, veteran- and service disabled veteran-owned businesses. Our Supplier Diversity program seeks to provide equal access to procurement opportunities to qualified small and diverse suppliers.

Although we allow suppliers to self-certify, we also recognize certifications from several third-party certifying organizations.

We maintain a database that our procurement agents reference when seeking additional resources for bidding on Requests for Quotes (RFQs), Requests for Proposals (RFPs), and Requests for Information (RFIs).

Although registration does not guarantee a request for bid, it will offer our procurement personnel the ability to further identify your business capabilities when an opportunity arises.

Learn more and register as a supplier online.

The Small Business Administration establishes numerical definitions of what qualifies as a small business ("size standards"). Definitions vary across industries.

Learn more about Small Business Size Standards set by the Small Business Administration.

As defined by the Small Business Administration, a woman-owned business is at least 51% controlled by one or more women who are U.S. Citizens.

  • The ownership must be direct.
  • The ownership cannot be subject to conditions.
  • The woman must manage the day-to-day operations of the business.
  • The woman must make the long-term decisions for the business.
  • The woman must be able to provide documents demonstrating she meets these requirements.

Businesses can be certified as woman-owned through the Women's Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) or through other Local, State or National Government Agencies.

As established by the Small Business Administration, certain minority groups are presumed to be socially and economically disadvantaged and can qualify for the 8(a) program. These groups include: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Asian Pacific Americans and Subcontinent Asian Americans.

To qualify as minority-owned, the business must be at least 51% owned, managed and controlled by a person of the ethnicities listed above.

Businesses can be certified as minority-owned by The National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) or through other Local, State or National Government Agencies.

To qualify as a HUBZone Business, a business must meet the following requirements (as set forth by the Small Business Administration):

  • The business's principle office must be located within a "Historically Underutilized Business Zone." These include lands considered "Indian Country" and military facilities closed by the Base Realignment and Closure Act.
  • At least 35% of the business's employees must reside in a HUBZone.
  • Must be a small business by SBA standards.
  • Must be at least 51% owned and controlled by U.S. citizens, or a Community Development Corporation, an agricultural cooperative, or an Indian tribe.
  • HUBZone businesses must be certified by the Small Business Administration.

For more information, visit the Small Business Administration's Understanding the HUBZone Program.

Business that is at least 51% owned by one or more veterans.

In order to be recognized as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business by the Small Business Administration, the business must meet the following criteria:

  • As determined by the Department of Veteran Affairs or Department of Defense, the Service-Disabled Veteran must have a disability connected to their service.
  • The Service-Disabled veteran must unconditionally own 51% of the business.
  • The Service-Disabled veteran must control the management and daily operations of the business.
  • The Service-Disabled veteran must hold the highest officer position within the business.

For more information, visit Small Business Administration's Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses.